2012 NFL Combine Results – “Offensive Men of Steel”

Lock and load, we’re in full NFL Combine mode.  I guess we have been throughout the weekend and really we’re coming down to the final day of drills to round out the defensive side of the ball.  There have been some “eye popping” performances as there is every year and somehow we tend to forget that previous years’ Combines have produced some phenomenal one-time feats of athletic prowess.  Yet with each successive draft, the bullets get faster, the locomotives get more powerful and the buildings get taller.

As I reviewed the various reactions to individual athletes and individual accomplishments in a particular drill, I couldn’t help but chuckle as players moved “up and down draft boards” while the GM’s, coaches and scouts sat in the stands and continued to take notes.  I kept getting this vision of a lonely intern charged with moving the magnets in the War Room after each and every running of the 40 yard dash.  “Move RGIII up to the 2nd pick and drop that linebacker down two rounds.”

Clearly the results at Lucas Oil Stadium are an important part of the overall equation in piecing together a final evaluation, but they aren’t the “be all, end all” by any means.  If you’ve been following The Football Educator’s posts up to the start of the 2012 NFL Combine, you know exactly what I’m speaking about.  The relevance of performance should be taken as an overall picture and contrasted to present and past rookie classes.  While the fact the Robert Griffin III ripped off a 4.41 in the 40 yard dash is impressive, by itself it is irrelevant.  The 40 yard dash doesn’t correlate to past success in the National Football League for the QB position.

It’s Griffin’s results in the 40 yard dash, along with the vertical jump and broad jump that make him a standout performer at this year’s NFL Combine.  But taken in context, Griffin was one of six at the position that showed “superman” athletic skills.

The NFL Combine is just one of a myriad of evaluation tools that clubs will use to set their draft boards.  Otherwise this “septathlon” would be an Olympic Event, not prime time for NFL Network.  So regardless of how you feel they played throughout the 2011 season or over the course of their college careers, here are the offensive players whose performances highly correlate with both past and present NFL starters at their respective positions.

You might be surprised…

QB

Last First School 40 Yards Bench Vertical Broad 3 Cone Short S Long S
Griffin III Robert Baylor 4.41 39 120
Harnish Chandler N Illinois 4.76 32.5 112 6.78 4.15
Harris Jacory Miami 4.72 37 113 7.10 4.40
Jefferson Jordan LSU 4.65 14 36.5 116 6.81 4.06
Luck Andrew Stanford 4.67 36 124 6.80 4.28
Wilson Russell Wisconsin 4.55 34 118 6.97 4.09

RB

Last First School 40 Yards Bench Vertical Broad 3 Cone Short S Long S
James LaMichael Oregon 4.45 15 35 123 6.88 4.12
Martin Doug Boise St 4.55 28 36 120 6.79 4.16 11.29
Meggett Davin Maryland 4.53 23 35 118 7.14 4.32 11.53
Rainey Chris Florida 4.45 16 36.5 120 7.36 3.93 11.06
Turbin Robert Utah St 4.50 28 36 122 7.16 4.31
Wilson David VPI 4.49 41 132 7.09 4.12 11.59

WR

Last First School 40 Yards Bench Vertical Broad 3 Cone Short S Long S
Martin Keshawn Mich St 4.45 13 39.5 122 6.85 4.13 11.16
Moore Kashif UConn 4.32 19 43.5 126 6.82 4.05
Owusu Chris Stanford 4.46 19 40.5 129 6.85 4.11 11.22

OL

Position Last First School 40 yards Bench Vertical Broad 3 Cone Short S
OC Gerhart Garth AZ State 5.42 25 30.5 96 7.63 4.65
OG Decastro David Stanford 5.43 34 29.5 98 7.30 4.56
OG Miller Ryan Colorado 5.27 32 28 100 7.72 4.78
OG Zeitler Kevin Wisconsin 5.39 32 29 101 7.77 4.61
OT Kalil Matt USC 4.99 30 30.5 105 7.95 4.74
OT Waldron Dustin Portland 5.34 29 35.5 114 7.52 4.78

TE

Last First School 40 Yards Bench Vertical Broad 3 Cone Short S Long S
Hanna James OK State 4.49 24 34.5 124 7.12 4.47 11.90

 

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